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Adopt-A-Park / Greenway

Dickens Farm Nature Area

Status: Needs 2 More Adopters
Description:
Nature Area Hours: 1 Hour Before Sunrise to 1 Hour After Sunset. Dickens Farm is a 52-acre interactive nature area with the St. Vrain Creek running through. Nature area highlights include ADA-accessible nature playground area and nature play discovery trail; beginner bike skills trail on easy rolling terrain and built with various trail materials; slower-moving water play areas; passive recreation areas; multiple shelter areas, including a large group shelter. The float from Main Street to the 119th Street Trailhead takeout is approximately 1.5 miles with an approximately 1.8-mile walk back along the St. Vrain Greenway trail. Parking options include a centrally located parking lot accessed from Boston Avenue and on-street parking along Boston. Public parking spots are available north of the Harvest Junction North shopping center (near Walgreens, Best Buy and Dick’s Sporting Goods). These public spots are labeled. Any other parking is at the user’s own risk. There is no public parking located near the takeout downstream of Martin Street (near BioLife Plasma Services, Taco Bell and Hilton Garden Inn). If desired, users can float past the Martin Street takeout to the 119th Street Trailhead, where an additional takeout point is located. Public parking is available at the 119th Street trailhead, which is located on the western side of 119th Street, south of Ken Pratt Boulevard and north of the St. Vrain Creek. The Art in Public Places Commission sought to honor the 2013 Flood with artwork that would celebrate resiliency, as well as the way the community and beyond came together during that difficult time. Artist Joshua Wiener was chosen by a selection panel with his proposal of "Rejuvenation," celebrating the power of the water, the strength of the people and the community. This project has been installed in the Dickens Farm Nature Area and is scheduled to be dedicated in 2020.
Location: Map

Sandstone Ranch Community Park

Status: Needs 2 More Adopters
Description:
Community Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Amenities include ball field(s), bbq grill or pit(s), concession stand (seasonal), fishing (all ages), multi-use field(s), parking lot(s), picnic area(s), playground(s), pond, public art, restroom(s), shelter(s), skate/wheels park, soccer field(s), spray water feature, trails (paved, gravel), Visitor Center, volleyball court(s) - sand. Nature Area Hours: 1 Hour Before Sunrise to 1 Hour After Sunset Sandstone Ranch Community Park and Nature Area is situated on 313 acres of land abundant in natural, cultural, and historic resources. It is both a community park and a nature area. The western side of the park features a 4-plex ball field complex. The eastern side of the park (as well as the address for the Visitors Center) features sports fields, a skate park, adventure playground and group picnic shelter.
Location: Map

McIntosh Lake Nature Area

Status: Needs 2 More Adopters
Description:
For the purposes of Adopt-A-Park only, the nature area encompasses all areas with in the loop trail, except Flanders and Dawson Park (those are adopted separately). McIntosh Lake is a reservoir and as such is part of the statewide ditch and reservoir system. Each year, the water level in McIntosh Lake is dependent on systemwide priorities and weather factors such as snowpack and precipitation. Amenities include boating (non-motorized, carry on boats only), fishing (all ages), paddle boarding, picnic area(s), restroom(s), trails (paved, gravel). Nature Area Hours: 1 Hour Before Sunrise to 1 Hour After Sunset Carry-on, non-motorized boats only. This includes canoes, kayaks, paddleboards, belly boats, sailboards, sailboats and small boats that can be carried to the lake. Access to lake is only at the designated boat ramps. Boat limit: 25. We ask that if you count 25 boats on the lake, please do not launch your boat. No inner tubes; only multiple chambered inflatable craft such as belly boats. Swimming is prohibited. Dogs must be on a leash at all times. No glass containers.
Location: Map

Garden Acres Community Park

Status: Needs 2 More Adopters
Description:
Community Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Dogs allowed on leash, please pick up after your pet. Garden Acres Community Park was initially developed in 1989 and was the third community park built in Longmont. The park was recently updated and features a lighted softball four-plex, soccer fields, batting cages, a cricket pitch, shelters, playgrounds, an irrigation pond and walking paths. The Oligarchy Ditch Primary Greenway Trail also runs through the park. In 1994, Longmont's Art in Public Places Committee commissioned local artist Jerry Boyle to create a life-size bronze sculpture for the south entrance to the park,"Free-For-All," a whimsical portrait of three children at play. Amenities include ball field(s), batting cage, cricket pitch(es), multi-use field(s), parking lot(s), picnic area(s), handicap accessible playground(s), pond, public art, restroom(s), shelter(s), trails (paved).
Location: Map

Izaak Walton Nature Area

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Nature Area Hours: 1 Hour Before Sunrise to 1 Hour After Sunset Izaak Walton Nature Area was donated to City of Longmont in 1989 by the V.V. Golden Foundation. Used for nearly half a century by the Izaak Walton League for sport fishing and skeet-shooting, this facility sat unimproved until 1999. The nature area features native vegetation, wildlife habitat enhancements and passive recreational activities. The site is 21.5 acres in size which includes a 15.7-acre pond. The nature area is also a trail head along the St. Vrain Greenway. "Gather Enough People Here" is a mechanical art piece installed by Robert Tully in 1999, and is found at the southwestern corner of the pond. The pond was dedicated as a youth fishing pond. Nature Area Hours: 1 hour before sunrise to 1 hour after sunset. Dogs must be leashed at all times and are not permitted in the water. Deposit all trash and litter in designated trash receptacles. No glass or alcohol permitted. Restrooms are available.
Location: Map

Dog Park #2

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Dog Park Hours: 1 Hour Before Sunrise to 1 Hour After Sunset. Dog Park #2 is located 0.2 miles west of the corner of Airport Road and St. Vrain Road. Water will be available during the third Monday of April until the second Monday of October. The park may be closed during parts of the year to allow the grass to re-establish. Amenities include dog park, parking lot(s), picnic area(s), restroom(s), shelter(s), and water spigot. This Dog Park is currently located on land associated with the Public Works Operations Facility. When the Public Works Facility expands, the Dog Park will be relocated to a nearby location. The timing of the facility expansion and the dog park relocation is currently unknown.
Location: Map

Willow Farm Neighborhood Park

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Amenities include barn (reservable), basketball court(s), bbq grill or pit(s), multi-use field(s), parking lot(s), picnic area(s), playground(s), restroom(s), roller hockey rink, shelter(s), trails (paved). Willow Farm Park is a 10.8 acre neighborhood park that features a farm theme in recognition of the barn that was moved to the site and restored for use as a shelter with restrooms. The playground includes various barn structures, cows and tractor play elements. Located along Dry Creek, the park has numerous mature shade trees along its banks. The enclosed shelter portion of the barn includes six picnic tables. It is located adjacent to the playground and restrooms. Play elements include a full-sized roller hockey court, multi-use play field, ball field, playground and walkways. Alphabet Farm is an interactive Art in Public Places project by Andrew Dufford and Christian Muller, with whimsical pieces to be discovered throughout the park.
Location: Map Street View

Dry Creek Greenway West

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
The Dry Creek Greenway West Trail runs from Blue Skies Neighborhood Park to North 75th Street. (Dry Creek Greenway East is east of Dry Creek Park, running from Grandview Meadows Drive to Willow Farm Park). As development continues, the Dry Creek Greenway will link the two existing trail segments within Dry Creek Community Park (west of Grandview Meadows Drive and east of Mountain Drive). This Greenway will eventually connect to Village at the Peaks at Hover Street. Other facilities found along this greenway include: Eagle Crest Elementary School, Altona Middle School, Silver Creek High School and Blue Mountain Elementary School. Dry Creek Greenway opens to several detention pond sites that are also part of the Longmont park system.
Location: Map

Spangler Neighborhood Park

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Amenities include bbq grill or pit(s), multi-use field(s), picnic area(s), handicap accessible playground(s), pond, restroom(s), shelter(s), trails (paved), volleyball court(s) -sand. The five-acre park has a picnic shelter that can be reserved. Also found at Spangler park are restrooms, a playground, multi-purpose fields and a sand volleyball court. Named after D.W. Spangler (1869-1959), who settled in the St. Vrain Valley in 1889, Spangler Park straddles Spring Gulch. D.W. Spangler moved west from Kansas when he contracted tuberculosis while studying at Morrill Normal College. He worked in the Webster Nursery and later taught school in Longmont. An influential and highly respected educator, Spangler taught at the high school for 43 years. In addition, he operated his own nursery, raised bees, and became involved in church and civic affairs. His son, Keith Spangler, was the City Clerk for many years. Longmont Christian School, located northwest of the park, was formerly Spangler Elementary School.
Location: Map

Quail Campus Community Park

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Community Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Amenities include museum & cultural center, parking lot(s), picnic area(s), pond, pool (indoor, year-round, handicap accessible), public art, recreation center, restroom(s), skate/wheels park, tennis court(s). The City of Longmont was gifted the land that comprises Quail Campus by Donald Baker as part of a larger annexation to the City. The 44-acre parcel of land includes a 10 tennis court complex and 18 developed acres where the Longmont Recreation Center and Museum and Cultural Center are located.
Location: Map

Raber Neighborhood Park

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Amenities include picnic area(s), handicap accessible playground(s), shelter(s). Raber Park is named for Donald "Shorty" Raber, who was a Longmont police officer for 27 years, a safety officer for 10 years, and founded the Longmont Emergency Unit in 1957. In addition, Raber served as curator of the Longmont Pioneer Museum from 1970 to 1980. Raber Park, built in 1987, covers 3.2 acres next to Sanborn Elementary School. The park features a shelter and playground amid large shrub beds and a pleasant sitting area. It connects to the south part of the neighborhood via a secondary greenway path.
Location: Map

Roosevelt Community Park

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Community Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Amenities include activity pool (outdoor, seasonal), bbq grill or pit(s), ice rink (seasonal), parking lot(s), pavilion, picnic area(s), playground(s), public art, recreation center, restroom(s), Memorial rose garden, Senior Center, shelter(s). Roosevelt Park, presumably named for President Theodore Roosevelt after his visit to Longmont in 1900, is one of the original parks planned by the Chicago-Colorado Colony. Covering three city blocks, the land was purchased in 1871 by J.M. Mumford for $2.48 at a tax sale and donated to the City in 1892. At first, the park was called Lake Park, then Longmont Driving Park, and featured a lake used for ice skating, a half-mile race track, and racing barns. The Roosevelt Park Auditorium, built in 1915, was used for the popular Jitney dances in the 30's, exhibits, the Boulder County Fair, and for other events. The auditorium was the City's largest meeting place for decades. In 1921, the great singer Madam Schumann Heink gave a concert there.
Location: Map Street View

Dawson Neighborhood Park

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Dawson Neighborhood Park borders McIntosh Lake on the northwest side of Longmont. With commanding views of the mountains, this 15-acre park offers shoreline fishing, tennis, and a restful walking trail system. Dawson Park adjoins McIntosh Lake Nature Area, which also links to Flanders Neighborhood Park and Boulder County's Lohr Open Space and Agricultural Heritage Center at Lohr-McIntosh Farm. Amenities include boating (non-motorized, carry on boats only), fishing (all ages), paddle boarding, picnic area(s), handicap accessible playground(s), public art, restroom(s), shelter(s), tennis court(s), trails (paved and gravel), volleyball court(s) - sand. Dawson Silverwood, a stainless steel tree by artist Steve Jensen, was installed in 2003 at this park. The park was named for John Dawson (1839-1917), who joined the Chicago-Colorado Colony in 1871 and farmed east of Hygiene. The lake was called Dawson Lake before taking the name McIntosh Lake. The park was named in 1973 and developed in 1981.
Location: Map Street View

Carr Neighborhood Park

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. This 8.4 acre park is located west of Northridge Elementary School. Amenities include ball field(s), basketball court(s), bbq grill or pit(s), multi-use field(s), parking lot(s), picnic area(s), handicap accessible playground(s), restroom(s), roller hockey rink, shelter(s), tennis court(s). Carr Park takes its name from Byron Leander Carr (1842-1899) and his wife, Mary Lord Pease Carr (1837-1933). Mr. Carr was a school teacher and attorney who settled in Longmont in 1871. He later served on the Colorado Constitutional Convention and as Attorney General for the new state of Colorado. Mrs. Carr taught with her husband in Longmont's first school. Later, she became a leader in political and civic affairs throughout the region, serving as the first woman on the Longmont School Board and as its president. The park was built in 1978.
Location: Map Street View

Price/Sunset Neighborhood Park

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Dogs allowed on leash, please pick up after your pet. Amenities include bbq grill or pit(s), concession stand (seasonal), golf course, parking lot(s), picnic area(s), playground(s), handicap accessible pool (outdoor, seasonal), restroom(s), shelter(s), volleyball court(s) - sand. This 1.3 acre neighborhood park sits atop the highest point in Longmont near Sunset Golf course and Sunset Swimming pool. The park is found east of the old water tower on Sunset Street. An open play area and picnic tables are found in this quiet refuge with mature trees.
Location: Map

Clark Centennial Community Park

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Community Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Dogs allowed on leash, please pick up after your pet. Clark Centennial Community Park, one of the largest parks in Longmont, covers 48.5 acres. It is home to Centennial Swimming Pool, an aquatics facility with indoor pool and weight room; Lashley Street Station, a former fire station that has been converted into an activity room and meeting spaces; Youth Center, home to the Children, Youth and Families division and a variety of youth-oriented after-school and summer activities; a disc golf course; and softball/baseball fields. Timberline PK-8 School is located to the north and the Longmont YMCA is located to the southwest of the park. The park also features "Dance Steps" a mural on the wall of the Youth Center, commissioned by Art in Public Places in 1996. The Oligarchy Ditch and Primary greenway runs through the park. Clark Centennial Community Park resulted from a donation of land by Helen Noble Clark in 1971. Her father-in-law, George Clark (1839-1914), was an English immigrant who came to Longmont in 1873 and built a farm on east 9th Avenue. Each year until her death, Mrs. Clark gave $10,000 to the City in memory of her husband Lynn W. Clark, for further improvements to the park. The park was built in 1974.
Location: Map

Thompson Neighborhood Park

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Amenities include gardens, picnic area(s), playground(s), restroom(s), shelter(s). Thompson Neighborhood Park is one of the three parks designed into the original Chicago-Colorado Colony town plat. The park is named after Elizabeth Rowell Thompson (1820-1899), a renowned philanthropist, temperance reformer and abolitionist who lived on the East Coast. A Boston reporter in 1899 called her the "founder of Longmont, Colorado." Covering an area of 4.2 acres, the park has two picnic shelters equipped with picnic tables and grills. The southwestern shelter is nearest to playground and restrooms. The park has two shelters which may be reserved for a fee. An open turf area and mature trees and plantings provide cool sanctuary on hot summer days.
Location: Map

119th St. Trailhead - St. Vrain Greenway

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Hours of use for greenway trailheads and greenway lands is 1 hour before sunrise to 1 hour after sunset, while the greenway trail itself is open 24 hours, 7 days a week as long as users maintain continuous movement on the trail. This trailhead provides parking and amenities for the St. Vrain Greenway Trail and access to St. Vrain Creek. The St. Vrain Greenway Trail runs approximately 8 miles through Longmont from Sandstone Ranch Community Park and Nature Area on the east end to Golden Ponds Nature Area to the west. The 119th Street Trailhead provides parking, trailer parking, restrooms, a shelter, picnic tables, and a take-out point for water recreation in the creek.
Location: Map Street View

Kanemoto Neighborhood Park

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Amenities include activity pool (outdoor, seasonal), basketball court(s), multi-use field(s), outdoor fitness equipment, pagoda, parking lot(s), picnic area(s), handicap accessible playground(s), restroom(s), shelter(s), trails (paved), volleyball court(s) - sand. Donated to the City of Longmont by the Kanemoto family in 1966, Kanemoto Park is a seven-acre park within Southmoor Park, a neighborhood built by the family on land they had farmed. Goroku Kanemoto (1882-1935) immigrated from Japan in 1910. He worked on the railroad, then in Colorado on potato and beet fields until he could lease his own farm. His sons George and James became truck farmers and businessmen, as well as leaders in the community and in the Buddhist Church. Kanemoto Park showcases the Tower of Compassion, a structure built in the style of a traditional Japanese temple. It was donated to the people of Longmont by the Kanemoto family as an expression of gratitude and giving selflessly of oneself. On a nearby plaque is explanation of the five-story tower. Each level represents the meaning of compassion: Love, Empathy, Understanding, Gratitude of all Things, and Giving Selflessly of Oneself. Kanemoto Park was extensively damaged as a result of citywide flooding in September 2013. All park amenities have been fully restored. A children's activity pool with a slide feature is found at the eastern end of the park. Left Hand Greenway borders the park to the south, extending east and west with connection to the St. Vrain Greenway. Burlington Elementary School is located north of the park.
Location: Map

Dry Creek Greenway East

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Hours of use for Greenway Trailheads and Greenways are one hour before sunrise to one hour after sunset, while the Greenway Trail itself is open 24 hours, 7 days a week given there is continuous movement on the trail. The Dry Creek Greenway East Trail runs west from Willow Farm Neighborhood Park (at Fordham Street) to Grandview Meadows Drive (near Silver Creek High School). (The Dry Creek Greenway West Trail is further west, running from Blue Skies Neighborhood Park to North 75th Street). As development continues, the Dry Creek Greenway will link the two existing trail segments within Dry Creek Community Park (west of Grandview Meadows Drive and east of Mountain Drive). This Greenway will eventually connect to Village at the Peaks at Hover Street. Other facilities found along this greenway include: Eagle Crest Elementary School, Altona Middle School, Silver Creek High School and Blue Mountain Elementary School. Dry Creek Greenway opens to several detention pond sites that are also part of the Longmont park system.
Location: Map

Loomiller Neighborhood Park

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Loomiller Park is a 15-acre park located in central Longmont. It was named after Fred Loomiller (1863-1950), and his wife Grace (1883-1965). Part of the park's land was donated to the City by the Loomiller's children in 1962. Five additional acres were purchased for $7,965. Loomiller came from Quincy, Ill. in 1891 and settled in the Hygiene area. In 1898 he bought a 160-acre farm. The park site includes a large pond spanned by a bridge with a scenic walkway that winds through the park to a playground and restroom building. There are two shelters, one is located near the playground and restroom and the other is in the north central part of the park closer to the pond. The park is located just north of Longmont High School and is a popular spot for disc golfers. Other amenities include bbq grill or pit(s), disc golf course, picnic area(s), playground(s), pond, restroom(s), shelter(s). Loomiller Park is fondly referred to as "Duck Park" by surrounding residents, but feeding the ducks and geese disturbs the natural feeding and migrating patterns of the waterfowl. Please do not feed the ducks and geese in the park!
Location: Map

Valley Neighborhood Park

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Amenities include basketball (Hoops, not full court), bbq grill or pit(s), horseshoe pit/court, picnic area(s), playground(s), shelter(s), volleyball court(s) - sand. Valley Park is a 2-5 acre park located north of Golden Ponds Nature Area in the Valley subdivision. The park can be accessed from Ninth Avenue and Hayden Court where it meets up with Troxel Avenue. The park offers open play fields, a playground, small basketball court, sand volleyball court, a shelter and walkways.
Location: Map Street View

Rough and Ready Neighborhood Park

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Amenities include basketball court(s), bbq grill or pit(s), bocce ball court(s), crawdad exploration area, dog park, horseshoe pit/court, labytinth, multi-use field(s), parking lot(s), picnic area(s), playground(s), public art, restroom(s), shelter(s), skate/wheels park, trails (paved), volleyball court(s) - sand. This 9-acre park includes a small skate area, basketball court, sand volleyball court, bocce ball and horseshoe courts, multi-use play field, walking labyrinth, crawdad exploration area, an off-leash dog exercise area, and two play areas with traditional swings and other non-traditional play equipment. An irrigation pond hosts a beautiful art piece titled Bird Bath by Fort Collins artist Tim Upham. The park's design was based on a natural, passive theme with representations of that theme found throughout the design. The eastern portion of the park was dedicated to passive recreation, with the labyrinth and bocce ball and horseshoe courts grouped together. Soft-surface walking paths and native grass areas border the eastern and western edges of the park. The pond is shaped like a bird and the sculpture in the pond incorporates bird-like shapes and moving water. The large shelter features four tables and a grill, while the small shelter includes 2 tables and a grill.
Location: Map

Rothrock Dell Neighborhood Park

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Amenities include ball field(s), basketball court(s), picnic area(s), handicap accessible playground(s), restroom(s), roller hockey rink, shelter(s), trails (paved). Located next to Rocky Mountain Elementary School, Rothrock Dell Park was named in 1973, to commemorate two early families joined by marriage. William H. Rothrock (1867-1955), was born at his father's ranch on Boulder Creek and grew up to be a famous horseman. He managed the horse herd and then the entire ranch until 1926 when he retired to Longmont. Rothrock's father, John, had joined gold seekers traveling west in 1858, but he found he could make far more money farming and selling potatoes than mining. He built the first log cabin in Boulder County. In 1893, William married Clara Agnes Dell (1873-1975), daughter of George T. Dell, owner of the valley's first hardware store at 324 Main St., who had come to Longmont in 1871. Rothrock Dell Park is a 6.4 acre park and was developed from 1977 to 1979, bordering the Oligarchy Greenway. Many schoolchildren and neighbors enjoy the park's ball field, sports courts and playground.
Location: Map Street View

McCall Lake Nature Area

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Nature Area Hours: 1 Hour Before Sunrise to 1 Hour After Sunset. McCall Lake is open to the general public and there is no entry fee. Amenities include boating (non-motorized, carry on boats only), fishing (all ages), parking lot(s), pond, restroom(s). McCall Lake is a 35-acre reservoir offering great shoreline access for fishing. Anglers might catch bass, crappie, bluegill, catfish, wiper and trout. The lake is primarily used for irrigation to city parks via the Longmont Supply Ditch Company. During drought periods, water is exchanged for other water used at the water treatment plants and delivered through the Longmont Supply Ditch.
Location: Map Street View

Dog Park #1

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Dog Park Hours: 1 Hour Before Sunrise to 1 Hour After Sunset. Please park west of the dog park at Garden Acres Community Park or east of the dog park at Carr Neighborhood Park. Both lots are located on 21st Avenue. Be courteous to the neighbors. Neighborhood parking is discouraged. Amenities include dog park, picnic area(s), and shelter(s). The park may be closed during parts of the year to allow the grass to re-establish. Find a listing of additional dog parks on our main Dog Parks webpage as well as detailed guidelines and courtesies for visitors.
Location: Map

Stephen Day Neighborhood Park

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Amenities include basketball court(s), bbq grill or pit(s), BMX/Mtn. bike area, dog park, multi-use field(s), parking lot(s), picnic area(s), playground(s), restroom(s), shelter(s), skate/wheels park, spray water feature, trails (paved), volleyball court(s) - sand. Stephen Day Park held a grand opening on July 26, 2005. The park is on the corner of East Mountain View Avenue and Deerwood Drive - south of Fall River Elementary School. The park was named in honor of Stephen Day, a local Vietnam war veteran who won a distinguished service award and a Bronze Star. The park's features include a skate area and BMX / mountain bike area, basketball court, sand volleyball court, multi-use play field, off-leash dog exercise area, water spray ground for the kids (and adults) to play in. Landmarks and the Explorers Plaza are Art in Public Places pieces by Joe McGrane, installed in 2005, and are on the northern and eastern sides of the park. There are two shelters at the park - the west shelter is 12' x 18' with two picnic tables and a grill overlooking the multi-use field. The large shelter is 18' x 36' with four picnic tables and two grills and located south of the play and spray ground area (exclusive use is not available).
Location: Map

Left Hand Creek Neighborhood Park

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Amenities include basketball hoops (not full court), bbq grill or pit(s), multi-use field(s), parking lot(s), playground(s), public art, restroom(s), roller hockey rink, shelter(s), trails (paved, gravel), volleyball court(s) - sand. This 11.5-acre park is located along Left Hand Creek south of Pike Road. The park was constructed in 1997 and open to the public in 1998. The park features a roller hockey rink and separate basketball court, extensive playground area including an adjacent 'ground maze', multi-use play fields, picnic shelters, walkways, creek overlook and sand volleyball court located near the western shelter. The eastern shelter is located in the middle of the playground.
Location: Map

Affolter Neighborhood Park

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5 a.m. to 11 p.m. The park is 5.5 acres in size and is located east of Sunset Middle School and north of Indian Peaks Elementary School. Amenities include ball field(s), basketball court(s), football field(s), handball wall, multi-use field(s), handicap accessible playground(s), restroom(s), shelter(s), soccer field(s), tennis court(s), tennis practice court. Affolter Park is named after Frederick Affolter (1832-1895), a Swiss immigrant who settled in the St. Vrain Valley in 1862 and started a dairy farm. His 10 children all graduated from Longmont High School and attended college, becoming prominent residents in the area. Affolter Neighborhood Park was named in 1973 and developed in 1978.
Location: Map Street View

Lanyon Neighborhood Park

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Amenities include ball field(s), basketball court(s), bbq grill or pit(s), multi-use field(s), picnic area(s), handicap accessible playground(s), public art, restroom(s), shelter(s). Located along the Oligarchy Ditch in north central Longmont, Lanyon Park commemorates contributions made to the community by Ray Lanyon. Lanyon was a local newspaper editor and publisher who also served as Mayor from 1931 to 1942. The Lanyon Fund was established after Ray Lanyon's death in 1981 and made annual grants to the community. Lanyon Park was purchased in 1964 for $15,184 and is 8.4 acres. It includes established stands of cottonwood and willow trees that provide shade for picnics along the Oligarchy Ditch.
Location: Map

Jim Hamm Nature Area

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Nature Area Hours: 1 Hour Before Sunrise to 1 Hour After Sunset. Amenities include bbq grill or pit(s), bird blind, parking lot(s), picnic area(s), handicap accessible playground(s), pond, restroom(s), shelter(s), trails (paved and gravel). Originally developed in 1976, the Jim Hamm Nature Area comprises 24 acres, including a 14-acre pond. This land was donated in 1974 by the Hamm family in memory of USAF Captain Jim Hamm who was shot down over Vietnam in 1968 and to honor all St. Vrain Valley Veterans who fought in that war. Jim spent his youth exploring and appreciating the wild environment that once was part of his grandfather's farm (Elmer Montgomery). The pond at the site is a designated bird sanctuary that welcomes a variety of waterfowl throughout the year. The panoramic vista of the Front Range as seen from the area is illustrated on a panel located on the view deck over the pond. In 1998, a master plan was completed for the nature area which recommended additional land be added to the South edge of the original site which was accomplished through an additional Hamm family donation in 2002. Development of the nature area was completed in phases with earlier phases complete in 2001 and 2006, and the most recent and final phase complete in 2014. The area is used by the public for passive recreation and is a Nature Area. St. Vrain Valley School District uses the site for environmental learning projects and the VFW and American Legion holds Memorial and Veterans Day events at the site. The pond water is supplied by Ute Creek and Spring Gulch. The water level fluctuates by season and year, influencing the kind and number of birds that use the pond. The foothills Audubon Society has conducted several bird counts there spotting as many as 80 different bird species.
Location: Map

Pratt Neighborhood Park

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Amenities include ball field(s), basketball court(s), picnic area(s), playground(s), restroom(s), roller hockey rink, shelter(s), tennis court(s). Named for Anna May Williamson Pratt and Harold Pratt, Pratt Park covers 4.2 acres next to Longmont Estates Elementary School. Harold Pratt was president of a local real estate business founded by his father Marion in 1912. Pratt Park features tennis courts and a roller-hockey/basketball court. A picnic shelter is attached to the restroom and is close to the playground.
Location: Map

Flanders Neighborhood Park

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Flanders Neighborhood Park, located north of McIntosh Lake across from Dawson Neighborhood Park, was built in 1995 and gets its name from the Flanders family, leaders in Longmont's business and civic affairs for five generations. The family is descended from Frederick Walter Flanders (1866-1935), a prominent realtor and banker who moved to Longmont in 1904, and served as mayor in 1927-28, when he ousted the mayor supported by the Ku Klux Klan. The park is on the site of the Flanders farm; a historic marker identifies a remnant of the milk house. Flanders Park features a multiple-use court suitable for both roller hockey and basketball, a playground and a shelter. Xeriscape landscaping showcases hearty and native plants along the pathways, which offer spectacular views of McIntosh Lake and the mountains to the west. McIntosh Lake Nature Area and greenway trail connect Flanders Neighborhood Park to Dawson Neighborhood Park and also to the Agricultural Heritage Center at Lohr-McIntosh Farm (managed by Boulder County Parks and Open Space). This 7-acre park is accessed from a parking lot off North Shore Drive.
Location: Map

Hover Acres Neighborhood Park

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Amenities include basketball court(s), bbq grill or pit(s), crawdad exploration area, horseshoe pit/court, multi-use field(s), parking lot(s), pickleball, picnic area(s), playground(s), restroom(s), shelter(s), trails (paved), volleyball court(s) - sand. Hover Acres Park is named after Charles Lewis Hover (1867-1955), who moved to Longmont in 1902, with his wife Katherine and daughter Beatrice. In 1914 he built a spacious home on his farm near what was then a quiet country lane. A prominent businessman in Denver, Colorado Springs and then Longmont, Hover served as president of many local, county and state organizations, such as the Colorado Farm Congress and the Council of Defense (World War I). Hover Acres Park sits on the south end of the Longmont Supply Greenway and offers a number of amenities in this 10 acre park.
Location: Map

Union Reservoir Nature Area

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Nature Area Hours: 1 Hour Before Sunrise to 1 Hour After Sunset. Amenities include bbq grill or pit(s), boat storage, boating (wakeless), dog beach, fishing (all ages), fishing pier, paddle boarding, parking lot(s), picnic area(s), playground(s), restroom(s), scout circle, shelter(s), swim beach, volleyball court(s) - sand. Union Reservoir is a 736 acre body of water providing many outdoor recreational activities. Originally called Calkins Lake, the reservoir was carved out during the last glacial age and is one of only a few natural lakes in Colorado. In 1903, the Union Ditch Company began drilling a tunnel to release water into the St. Vrain Creek. According to Colorado water law, that made Union a true reservoir.
Location: Map

Roger's Grove Nature Area

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Nature Area Hours: 1 Hour Before Sunrise to 1 Hour After Sunset. Amenities include amphitheater, bbq grill or pit(s), boating (belly boats only), community garden, fishing (all ages), orchard, parking lot(s), picnic area(s), pond, restroom(s), shelter(s), trails (paved, gravel). Roger's Grove Nature Area consists of 54.9 acres adjacent to the St. Vrain Greenway and includes Fairgrounds Lake, trails, a shelter, outdoor amphitheater, restrooms, native landscaping, demonstration gardens and an apple grove with fruit free for your harvest! Design and construction of the nature area was primarily funded by the Roger and Roberta Jones Foundation. Roger Jones (1915-1995), enjoyed walking along the river with his wife Roberta (1913-1992). Both educators in the St. Vrain Valley School system, the Jones' wanted to contribute an environment for children and adults to visit, learn and enjoy. Roger's Grove was developed as a nature area, arboretum and outdoor learning center. Additional funding came from the Colorado Lottery and Great Outdoors Colorado. Designed in 1994, the nature area was constructed in phases from 1995 to 1998. Louisville artist Robert Tulley installed several works of art in Roger's Grove as part of the City's Art in Public Places program. "Waterline," "Kestrel's Way," and "Prairie Underground" were all dedicated in 1995. Nearby is found "Listening Stones," also by Robert Tulley and dedicated in 1998 along the nearby St. Vrain Greenway trail. The City's major, annual, "signature" event, "Rhythm on the River", is held in Roger's Grove every July.
Location: Map Street View

Dry Creek Community Park

Status: Needs 1 More Adopters
Description:
Community Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Dry Creek Community Park is a 23-acre park named for the creek running through the site. Amenities at the park include a multi-tiered and ADA accessible playground, restrooms, parking, walking paths and Dry Creek Greenway trail connection from Grandview Meadows Drive to Blue Skies Park, an 18 hole disc golf course, and a sledding hill. There is also a multi-use sports field including cricket pitches. Visit the Plans, Maps & Reports webpage and click Map of Parks in Longmont to see all parks displayed on an interactive map. Choose from the Amenities dropdown menu to find parks with the amenity you are seeking, such as playground, pool, or picnic area.
Location: Map
Adopters:
  • Deere & Ault Consultants

Alta Neighborhood Park

Status: Adopted
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Alta Neighborhood Park is a small park on the corner of 10th Avenue and Alta Street. One-half acre in size, this park has a shelter, community gardens and a playground. It has no restrooms. Amenities include a bbq grill or pit(s), community garden, picnic area(s), playground(s), shelter(s). Originally developed in 1915, this park was originally called North Longmont Park, a testimony to the old boundaries of the city. North Longmont (located north of Ninth Avenue) was incorporated into the town in 1904 and annexed in 1913.
Location: Map Street View
Adopters:
  • Life Skills Ace

Collyer Neighborhood Park

Status: Adopted
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Situated in the Historic East Side Neighborhood, this 4-acre park hosts many neighborhood activities. Its mature trees offer relaxing shade and respite from summer heat. Amenities include bbq grill or pit(s), pickleball, handicap accessible playground(s), restroom(s), shelter(s), tennis court(s), volleyball court(s) - sand. Collyer Neighborhood Park is one of the three original parks in the Chicago-Colorado Colony. It was named after Robert Collyer (1823-1912), a blacksmith's son born in Yorkshire, England, and grandson of one of Lord Nelson's sailors at Trafalgar. Collyer immigrated in 1850 and worked in Pennsylvania as a hammer maker and self-educated Methodist preacher. A prolific author and widely traveled speaker, he promoted the movement to Colorado with the idea of building a temperance colony, though he himself never moved west. Collyer Park was developed around 1871 on a full city block and is 4 acres in size. In 1920, the City built a bandstand in Collyer Park where the high school bands gave weekly concerts in the summer. In 1969, the bandstand was taken down.
Location: Map Street View
Adopters:
  • Girl Scout Troop 77927

Golden Ponds Nature Area

Status: Adopted
Description:
Nature Area Hours: 1 Hour Before Sunrise to 1 Hour After Sunset. Dogs are allowed on leash; please pick up after your pet. Amenities include bbq grill or pit(s), boating (belly boats only), fishing (all ages), parking lot(s), picnic area(s), restroom(s), shelter(s), trails (paved and gravel). Golden Ponds Nature Area opened in 1990. Land was donated to the City of Longmont by the V.V. Golden Foundation. Vernon Golden, who had mined gravel on this site, donated the land to Longmont residents as a place to fish, walk and enjoy nature. A bronze sculpture of "Vern" helping a small boy fish was donated by the family and is located along the path just west of the parking area. Golden Ponds was heavily damaged in the severe flooding that Longmont experienced in 2013. Replacement of the Golden Ponds spillway in the easternmost pond was completed in 2018. This work included a new pedestrian bridge over the spillway. All trails around Golden Ponds are once again accessible to the public. With a magnificent view of Longs Peak and the Front Range, this park features 88 acres including 56 acres of water surface in four ponds. The nature area is a trail head to the western end of the St. Vrain Greenway, and has 2.6 miles of trails, a handicap-accessible fishing pier, two restrooms and nine picnic shelters. Wildlife of all kinds, especially waterfowl like great blue herons and cormorants, are easily viewed in the park.
Location: Map
Adopters:
  • Harry Liu
  • Helen Ye

Kensington Neighborhood Park

Status: Adopted
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Amenities include Art on the Move, basketball court(s), bbq grill or pit(s), labyrinth, parking lot(s), handicap accessible playground(s), pond, public art, restroom(s), shelter(s), trails (paved). Kensington Park is a 16-acre neighborhood park which stretches from Ninth to Third avenues along the Spring Gulch Greenway. The Park was purchased for $2,000 in 1963 and features walking paths along a flowing ditch and pond, two playgrounds, a shelter, restroom, basketball court, labyrinth and the Paul David Rodriguez Memorial Garden at the south end of the park. Kensington Park is the home of a 1998 installed public art piece called "The Unity Project." It was designed by artists Susan Daily and Mario Echevarria.
Location: Map
Adopters:
  • Sustainable Resilient Longmont Zero Waste Committee

Blue Skies Neighborhood Park

Status: Adopted
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Blue Skies Park is located along Dry Creek #1 in southwestern Longmont and offers a trail connection to the Dry Creek #1 Greenway. Blue Mountain Elementary School is north of the park. Blue Skies is an 11-acre neighborhood park that was designed around a flight timeline with "themed" images found throughout the park. Interpretive signage, sandblasted images and other features throughout the park represent historic planes and images that walk visitors through the timeline of flight. The skate park and the playground also compliment the theme with features that represent elements of the Amelia Earhart plane and a rocket ship climber in the playground. Amenities include basketball court(s), bbq grill or pit(s), bird and butterfly garden, DaVinci garden, dog park, multi-use field(s), parking lot(s), playground(s), restroom(s), roller hockey rink, shelter(s), skate/wheels park, trails (paved), volleyball court(s) - sand. The name Blue Skies is a common airline pilot phrase and was suggested for a park name since Vance Brand Municipal Airport is nearby.
Location: Map
Adopters:
  • Edward Dunkin

Athletic Field Neighborhood Park

Status: Adopted
Description:
Neighborhood Park Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Athletic Field Neighborhood Park includes seating, a multiuse playing field, lighting, a basketball court and a play area. The park also features a spiral labyrinth that is designed to feature the rising water when the area floods. The park is 3.5 acres and located in the historic Kiteley Neighborhood north of downtown Longmont. This park was originally a detention area for the Loomiller storm sewer system. However, the Kiteley neighborhood envisioned the area as a multiuse area. While detention remains a primary function of the park, flooding is rare.
Location: Map Street View
Adopters:
  • Life Skills Ace

Left Hand Grwy - Quail Campus to Harvest Junction

Status: Adopted
Description:
This is a section of the Left Hand Greenway corridor including undeveloped land, the greenway trail, the ditch and Left Hand Creek. It is bordered by Quail Rd. to the south, Main St./Hwy. 287 and the greenway trail to the west, and Left Hand Creek and ditch to the north.
Location: Map
Adopters:
  • Dennis Strachota

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